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Welcome to Safety and Security Solutions!

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Bicycle Safety Lights

At Safety and Security Solutions we offer bicycle micro lights, a bicycle headlight and the multifunctional Safe Steps Arm Band and the Safe Steps LED Clip on Shoe Lights.
Each has a role to play in keeping you safe at night. Below are some startling statistics on distracted driving and bicycle safety for you to consider. We are also including some common sense safety tips borrowed from the Mississippi Department of Transportation as well as the Boston University Police.

This statement from the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety seems to say it all:


“Nighttime pedestrian accidents and
deaths are America’s most preventable
tragedies. Over 66% occur in the dark,
and reflectors are the ONLY PROVEN METHOD of making pedestrians and
cyclists visible at distances sufficient
for the motorist to slow down or stop”

 

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Distracted Driving


• In 2011, 3,331 people were killed nationally in crashes involving a distracted driver.
• Text messaging creates a risk 23 times worse than driving while not distracted.
• Contrary to popular belief, the human brain cannot multitask. Instead of processing both cognitive tasks at once, the brain rapidly switches between the two activities.
• Sending or receiving a text takes a driver’s eyes from the road for an average of 4.6 seconds, the equivalent - at 55 MPH - of traveling the length of an entire football field, blind.
• 660,000 drivers are using or manipulating electronic devices while driving at any given daylight moment in America.
• In 2012, an estimated 3,328 people were killed in distraction-related crashes. Another 421,000 people were injured.
• For drivers 15-19 years old involved in fatal crashes, 21% were distracted by the use of cell phones.
• Driving while using a cell phone reduces the amount of brain activity associated with driving by 37%.


Bicycle Safety Issues


• In 2012, 18% of the bicyclists injured in motor vehicle crashes were 14 and younger.
• All cyclists should wear properly fitted bicycle helmets every time they ride. A helmet is the single most effective way to prevent head injury resulting from a bicycle crash.
• Bicyclists are considered vehicle operators; they are required to obey the same rules of the road as other vehicle operators, including obeying traffic signs, signals, and lane markings. When cycling in the street, cyclists must ride in the same direction as traffic.
• Drivers of motor vehicles must allow at least three feet of clearance when passing a bicyclist on the road. It’s a Mississippi law.
• Be Safe Be Seen - Bicyclists should increase their visibility to drivers by wearing fluorescent or brightly colored clothing during the day, and at dawn or dusk. To be noticed when riding at night, use a front light and a red reflector or flashing rear light, and use retro-reflective tape or markings on equipment or clothing.
• highest injury rate (321) among bicyclists occurred in the 10-to-15 age group.
• Alcohol involvement was reported in more than 37 % of all fatal pedal cyclist crashes in 2012.
Mississippi Department of Transportation
401 North West Street
Jackson, Mississippi 39201
www.GoMDOT.com


More Bike Safety Tips


• Always wear a helmet.
• Learn, use, and obey traffic signals. Remember bikers must obey the same traffic laws as motor vehicles.
• If riding at night, use reflectors and lights.
• Give pedestrians the right of way.
• Ride defensively. Watch for cars and car doors opening.
• Do not weave in and out of traffic.
• Slow down at intersections. Look both ways before crossing.
• Keep your bike well maintained. A regular tune-up will ensure that your bike is in good riding shape.
• When you are not riding your bike, always lock it.
• When riding at night, make sure to wear reflective clothing and have reflectors on your bike. A light on your bike is also highly recommended.
Boston University Police